“Your computer has a virus’ cold call scams on the rise

Microsoft has recently reported that complaints are up 24% for tech support scams. And freshly released stats show 15% of complainants losing cash to the scam.

If you’re not familiar with how it works, a user will get a call from someone usually claiming to be from Microsoft who will talk the victim through a number of steps on their computer that will cause something technical or scary to appear on the user’s screen. At that point the scammer will declare the information showing is ‘evidence of a serious problem’. An offer to fix the problem for somewhere between $200 and $400 is then presented.

This scam is indiscriminate, targeting both businesses and individuals. It’s  particularly frustrating in that individuals over the age of 55 seem to be particularly targeted.

This is one of those IT areas where no software or network gizmo will protect the user. Only training can help and is one of the reasons why MicroData always includes End User Security Awareness Training as part of any IT system design. Contact us if you’d like some help with locating these sorts of resources.

And remind your users and friends that if they get a unsolicited call from anyone about a ‘problem’ with your computer and the individual claims to be with Microsoft (or anyone else), just put the phone down. Microsoft and other reputable vendors never make unsolicited calls to users.


 

 

Beware New Tech Support Scam

Here’s a new one you should alert your users to be on the lookout for. Over the last few years we’ve all become accustomed to receiving legitimate email alerts from providers such as Google, Yahoo, and Facebook when there was the possibility of a security risk such as a logon to your account from an unknown computer.

While cybercriminals have copied these emails in the past hoping to lure users into clicking on links taking them to infected sites, there’s now a new twist. Now the fake security email includes an 800 phone number that you’re told you need to call.

If you do you’ll either get to talk to a real cybercriminal – usually with a foreign accent – or you’ll bounce around voicemail for a while. But with either, you eventually end up being told that there’s something wrong with your computer and that they’ll fix it for you but need a credit card.

Remind your users to stop and think.

Everyone stay safe out there!


 

Dell Tech Support Scam

If you have any Dell computers, here’s a scam you want to be sure to alert your users about.

Users receive a call claiming to be from Dell support. They even have the service tag from your computer and potentially other personal information. The caller then tries to get you to provide them with remote access to ‘fix the problem’. If they get access they will then infect the computer with ransomware and also potentially ask for a credit card for a ‘required service charge’.

At this point it’s not clear where the bad guys have got the Dell service tag information, but with that in hand they have an extra degree of credibility, so make sure your users don’t fall for it.

Everyone stay safe out there!